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4 Reasons Why We Write

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Why Do We Write? To be fully alive.
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And how do you answer this question without falling into its many pitfalls or making any rookie mistakes? In this article, I'll explain why colleges want you to be able to explain why you are applying.

I'll also discuss how to generate and brainstorm topics for this question and how to make yourself sound sincere and committed. The purpose of the "why us" essay goes two ways. On the one hand, seeing how you answer this question gives admissions officers a sense of whether you know and value their school. On the other hand, having to verbalize why you a re applying gives you the chance to think about what you want to get out of your college experience, and whether your target schools fit your goals and aspirations.

And third, they want to see that this school will, in turn, be a good fit for you. Throughout this process of articulating your answers to the questions above, you will also benefit in a couple of key ways:. At the same time, by describing what is great about schools that are low on your list, you'll likely boost your enthusiasm for these colleges and keep yourself from feeling that they're nothing more than lackluster fallbacks.

Writing the "why us" essay can act as a moment of clarity. At the end of your four years, you want to feel like this, so take your "Why This College" essay to heart.

Want to write the perfect college application essay? Get professional help from PrepScholar. Your dedicated PrepScholar Admissions counselor will craft your perfect college essay, from the ground up. We'll learn your background and interests, brainstorm essay topics, and walk you through the essay drafting process, step-by-step.

At the end, you'll have a unique essay that you'll proudly submit to your top choice colleges. Don't leave your college application to chance. Find out more about PrepScholar Admissions now: This means that your essay will really be answering two separate, albeit related, questions:.

If the prompt instead is mostly configured as "why you? Your reasons for wanting to apply to a particular school can be made to fit either of these questions. For instance, say you really want the chance to learn from the world-famous Professor X. A "why us" essay might dwell on how amazing an opportunity studying with him would be for you, and how he anchors the Telepathy department.

Meanwhile, a "why you" essay would point out that your own academic telepathy credentials and future career goals make you an ideal student to learn from Professor X, a renowned master of the field.

Next up, I'll show you some real-life examples of what these two different approaches to the same prompt look like. I hear the Rings of Power Department is really strong at that school, too. Check out the Gandalf seminar on repelling Balrogs—super easy A. Tell me all about But when I get to campus, I'm starting a quidditch league.

No matter how the prompt is worded, this essay is a give-and-take of what you and the college have to offer each other. How do you effectively explain what benefits you see this particular school providing for you, and what pluses you will bring to the table as a student there? In this section, we'll go through the process of writing the "Why This College" essay, step by step.

First, I'll talk about the prep work you'll need to do. Next, we'll go through how to brainstorm good topics and touch on what topics to avoid. I'll give you some tips on transforming your ideas and research into an actual essay. Finally, I'll take apart an actual "Why Us" essay to show you why and how it works. Before you can write about a school, you'll need to know specific things that make it stand out and appeal to you and your interests.

So where do you look for these? And how do you find the detail that will speak to you? Here are some ways you can learn more about a school. Bring a notepad and write down the following: If you visit a class, note which class it is and who teaches it.

See whether you can briefly chat up a student e. Don't forget to write down the answer! You can also connect with students without visiting the campus in person. Many admissions websites list contact information for currently enrolled students you can email to ask one or two questions about what their experience of the school has been like. As always, take notes! Colleges publish lots and lots of different kinds of things—and all of these will be useful for your research.

Here are some suggestions for what you can use. You should be able to find all of the following resources online. Read the mission statement of the school—does its educational philosophy align with yours? You should also read through its catalogs. These interesting features you find should be unusual in some way or different from what other schools offer. Are any professors highlighted?

Does their research speak to you or connect with a project you did in high school or for an extracurricular? Does the construction of a new engineering school relate to your intended major? What stands out about their experiences?

Students write about the hot issues of the day, which means that the articles will be about the best and worst things on campus. Your target school is most likely on Facebook , Twitter , Instagram , and other social media. Follow the school to see what it's posting about. Any exciting new campus developments? Professors in the news? Interesting events, clubs, or activities? I also recommend looking for forums on College Confidential that specifically deal with the school you're researching.

Another option is to search on Google for interesting phrases, such as "What students really think about [School Name]" or "[School Name] student forum. So what should you do now that you've completed a bunch of research? These connections will be the skeleton of your "why this college" essay. Focus on what makes us unique and why that interests you. Do your research, and articulate a multi-dimensional connection to the specific college or university.

We do not want broad statements the brick pathways and historic buildings are beautiful or a rehash of the information on our website College X offers a strong liberal arts curriculum.

All institutions have similarities. We want you to talk about our differences. Time to find that diamond, amethyst, opal, tourmaline, or amber in the rough. This something should be seen from your own perspective. The exercise of rational thought or procedure to analyze a subject and to express in an orderly way the judgments arrived at through such analysis is called "discourse. Virtually all of the writing required of a student in high school or college should be discursive, and it is a truly unfortunate trend that highly personal and so-called "creative" writing has often been allowed to replace discursive writing in much of the curriculum.

The function of training in discursive writing is to enable the student to learn the habits and techniques of discursive thought, not to provide him with an outlet for expressing his feelings or "telling his story. Certainly some types of essay are expressive in these ways, and self-expression is a valid and valuable mode of communication. But such essays are precisely not the sort of writing that students should be doing in most of their classes. When a student draws on his personal experience in discursive writing, it should not be in order to reveal himself, but rather in order to illuminate the subject under discussion.

The examples offered from experience should point not inward, but outward, to universal concerns. Unfortunately, though, in our confessional culture virtually all discourse gets co-opted by the impulse toward self-revelation. The etymology of the word "discourse" is particularly interesting in this context. It comes to us from Latin, through French, and the word it derives from means to run back and forth. The purpose of discursive reasoning and writing is to "run back and forth" over a subject until it is completely understood-- i.

It is an act of learning or of teaching, not an act of personal self-expression, and certainly not an act of self-indulgence, as is so much "creative" writing. The attempt to write an essay or report about a subject will lead to a deeper understanding of that topic and to the long-term retention of the knowledge thus gained.

Why Do Colleges Want You to Write a

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The essay writing process is linked to learning; developing a sound essay writing technique enhances your learning. The Essay Writing Process You may be used to thinking of academic essays as documents, pieces of writing, but it’s perhaps more useful to think of an essay as a process.

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Apr 07,  · Also essay writting gives you practice organizing your thoughts and making a coherent paragraph. It will help you become more eloquant. Plus if you plan on to going to college being able to write an essay will be very useful as you will have more papers and essay tests than in high ggettsy.cf: Resolved.

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Why Do We Make Our Students Write Essays? Posted on April 13, by Jon David Groff under TQS Meaningful Learning Activities, TQS Moral/Ethical Framework, TQS Understand the Subject My blog post is a response to this blog post by the same title, written by Dr. Sarah Elaine Eaton, an educational leader, researcher, author, and . Dec 13,  · Mom, friends, educators, students: We don’t have to assign papers, and we should stop. We need to admit that the required-course college essay is a failure. We need to admit that the required-course college essay is a failure.

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Have you ever wondered why do teachers and professors give you this bunch of written assignments? Why can’t they ask you all that in an oral form? Why is it Important to Write Essays? By Lauren Bradshaw. August 22, To recap what we have learned throughout our guides, we first discussed 10 facts for on point argumentative essay. Why Students Should Have to Learn How to Write Discursive Essays. We have the capacity to learn how to reason, but that capacity does not come to fruition without careful nurturing. Just as the skilled athlete has, through diligent effort and application, honed physical capacities that are inherent but not well developed in most human.